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National Geographic natgeo natgeo Posts

natgeo. Video by Bertie Gregory @bertiegregory | A large male polar bear yawns

Video by Bertie Gregory @bertiegregory | A large male polar bear yawns during a snooze on the west coast of the Hudson Bay, in Manitoba, Canada. Aside from his blueish purple tongue, his mouth contains another interesting feature: the position of his teeth. Behind a polar bear's huge canines, there’s a gap where the teeth don’t erupt out the gum. This gap allows the canines to sink deeper into their seal prey, offering a greater grip to catch and pull seals of the water. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures #wild_life #wildlife #animals #ice #snow #bear #teeth #polar bear

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natgeo. Photo by Ira Block @irablockphoto | A quiet moment for a Moroccan came

Photo by Ira Block @irablockphoto | A quiet moment for a Moroccan cameleer in the sands of the Sahara, near the village of Merzouga. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, and Merzouga is the gateway to Erg Chebbi, a great expense of sand dunes. #follow me @irablockphoto for more photos from our planet. #desert #sand #saharadesert #camels #irablock

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natgeo. Photo by Jasper Doest @jasperdoest | My cousin Odette takes Flamingo B

Photo by Jasper Doest @jasperdoest | My cousin Odette takes Flamingo Bob out for a swim or a stroll on the beach almost every week. She loves seeing Bob in his natural environment, but realizes that he would never be able to survive out there. She rescued him almost three years ago after he flew against a hotel window on Curaçao, and during the rehabilitation process she found that he suffered from a chronic foot condition and couldn't go back to the wild. However, the idea that the bird is playing an important role in flamingo conservation in the Caribbean comforts her, and in the meantime they enjoy their weekly time off. Follow @jasperdoest for more images of Flamingo Bob. #flamingo #prettyinpink #flamingobob #curacao

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natgeo. Photo by Diana Markosian @markosian | A group of dancers in Grozny, Ch

Photo by Diana Markosian @markosian | A group of dancers in Grozny, Chechnya, wait to perform in the central square. After nearly two decades of war and 70 years of Soviet rule during which religious participation was banned, modern-day Chechnya is going through an Islamic revival. I traveled to Chechnya over the course of two years and watched as the republic transformed, with Chechen authorities building mosques in every village, prayer rooms in public schools, and enforcing a stricter Islamic dress code for both men and women. #chechnya

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natgeo. Photo by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | Putnam County, Georgia. Rock

Photo by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | Putnam County, Georgia. Rock Eagle is one of the few Native American effigy mounds in the United States east of the Ohio River. The scale of this artwork is immense. The bird image is made from quartzite rocks, hauled to the site. It is 120 feet wingtip to wingtip—about the size of a 737 jet airliner. Shockingly little is known about the artwork itself. Few cultural remains were found during archaeological digs, but it's estimated that the mound is at least 2,000 years old. This image is part of a project for my nonprofit @ancientartarchive that preserves and shares humanity's oldest stories. #rockeagle #effigymound

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natgeo. Photo by Gabriele Galimberti @gabrielegalimbertiphoto and Juri De Luca

Photo by Gabriele Galimberti @gabrielegalimbertiphoto and Juri De Luca | Fossils of long-extinct creatures aren’t just for museums. Today there’re in homes and businesses as wealthy collectors indulge a controversial hobby. A Kaatedocus siberi stands among an eclectic mix of wares at Theatrum Mundi, a private gallery in Arezzo, Italy. #dinosaur #fossil #extinct #dinosaurs

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natgeo. Photo by Dina Litovsky @dina_litovsky | Students in Kiev celebrate the

Photo by Dina Litovsky @dina_litovsky | Students in Kiev celebrate the last day of school by jumping into the city’s numerous fountains. The "last bell" ceremony dates to the Soviet Union era and is still observed in many post-Soviet cities. The festivities begin just after classes finish but before the final exams. For a couple of days, Kiev turns into a playground for students celebrating the beginning of summer. For more images, follow me @dina_litovsky.

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natgeo. Photo by Brian Skerry @brianskerry | A pair of Atlantic bluefin tuna,

Photo by Brian Skerry @brianskerry | A pair of Atlantic bluefin tuna, each weighing perhaps 1,000 pounds, swim in the chilly waters of Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence. Bluefin possess incredible biology. They continue to grow their entire lives, swim faster than torpedoes, crisscross the ocean each year, and generate heat in their bodies, allowing them to swim into cold waters to feed. Revered for centuries, their stocks have now dwindled. Follow @BrianSkerry to see more wildlife in the sea and to read the stories behind the photos. #bluefintuna #tuna

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natgeo. Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl | The last time Marina Kor

Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl | The last time Marina Korneeva heard about her home, it was being used by the army as an improvised morgue. Corpses were stored inside without refrigeration. Marina, 37, works as a pharmacist. She has a husband and a ten-year-old son. Shortly before the war, they built a beautiful family house in Marinka, a suburb of the regional capital Donetsk. When Donetsk was taken over by separatist forces, Marina’s neighborhood became the front line. It’s been five years since then, and the family still has no access to the house, even just to take a look. Soldiers at the checkpoint in the middle of their street will not let them through. Condolences aside, this situation leaves Marina with no chance of compensation. The Ukrainian state and international humanitarian organizations operating in the area both rely on the same procedure: a destroyed housing site first must be inspected by a special commission. No access to the site, no aid. Ironically, this approach excludes precisely those who suffered most by losing any chance to return home. In the government-controlled part of the Donetsk region alone, over a thousand apartment buildings and 12,000 private houses were damaged or destroyed during the war. Half of them remain unrepaired, and their inhabitants are at best displaced like Marina, at worst, homeless. Words by Alisa Sopova, from the series #5Kfromthefrontline, an ongoing project about the everyday consequences of the war in eastern Ukraine.

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natgeo. Photo by Trevor Frost @tbfrost | An 11-foot king cobra, the longest ve

Photo by Trevor Frost @tbfrost | An 11-foot king cobra, the longest venomous snake in the world, finishes his meal: a large Indian rat snake. And, yes, he ate it like spaghetti! The scientific name for the king cobra is Ophiophagus hannah. Ophiophagus means snake eater in Greek, which is appropriate because king cobras predominately eat other snakes, even venomous species. And while king cobras may indeed look like cobras with their distinct hoods, they are actually not in the cobra genus, Naja. At the moment I'd have to say this snake is the most impressive I've seen in the year I've been photographing snakes with Paul Rosolie. To see more from my time with this king cobra, I'm @tbfrost

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natgeo. Photo by Jimmy Chin @jimmychin | Yosemite National Park:  A rare bird’

Photo by Jimmy Chin @jimmychin | Yosemite National Park: A rare bird’s-eye view of El Capitan and Half Dome. For more images of wild landscapes around the world, follow @jimmychin

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natgeo. Photo by @jimrichardsonng // Sponsored by @IndigoAg // Piloting her 16

Photo by @jimrichardsonng // Sponsored by @IndigoAg // Piloting her 16-row combine with GPS-guided precision, farmer Annie Dee brought in her 2019 corn harvest when I visited her Alabama farm last month. Mankind’s autumn harvest rituals have become huge technological spectacles as we struggle to feed our burgeoning world population. Just as important—but harder to see—is what Annie is doing with her soil: She’s using no-till agriculture. By reducing tillage (not plowing and leaving crop residue in place), she can actually help in capturing carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering it in the soil. For a long time, world agriculture has been depleting soil carbon and releasing it into the atmosphere. Reversing that trend, especially on large-scale farms like Annie’s, could be a big win all around. // @IndigoAg is unlocking agriculture’s potential to help reverse climate change. That’s the vision behind the Terraton Initiative, a global movement with the goal of using regenerative farming practices to take one trillion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Follow @Terraton to see the progress.

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